A man who was merely a man and said the sort of things Jesus said would not be a great moral teacher. He would either be a lunatic — on the level with the man who says he is a poached egg — or else he would be the Devil of Hell. You must make your choice. Either this man was, and is, the Son of God, or else a madman or something worse.
– C.S. LEWIS, Mere Christianity

  • Apologetics
  • Evangelism
  • Discipleship
  • Church
  • Theology
  • Philosophy
  • All

We meet the person where he or she is

They (non Christians) are valuable, so we should meet them in love and compassion. Thus, we meet the person where he or she is. Consequently, if I were with Paul and Silas in the Philippian jail, and the Philippian jailer said to me, “sir, what must I do to be saved?” for me to start talking about epistemology would be horrible.

When Theology is Dangerous

I love studying theology. I teach a New Testament theology class at Talbot School of Theology, speak on theological issues at Summit Ministries, and teach a high school systematic theology class at a private school in Orange County. Along with philosophy, theology is one of my favorite topics to study. And I wholeheartedly believe that learning theology is vital for spiritual growth. But theology can also be dangerous. My concern is not with theology per se. In fact, good theology is critical for avoiding dangerous doctrines and preventing error (Titus 1:9). I wish the church would invest more time and resources in teaching good theology. I am convinced many young people disengage the church because of bad theology. My concerns here are with the way we teach—or often fail to teach—theology.

When Theology is Dangerous

I love studying theology. I teach a New Testament theology class at Talbot School of Theology, speak on theological issues at Summit Ministries, and teach a high school systematic theology class at a private school in Orange County. Along with philosophy, theology is one of my favorite topics to study. And I wholeheartedly believe that learning theology is vital for spiritual growth. But theology can also be dangerous. My concern is not with theology per se. In fact, good theology is critical for avoiding dangerous doctrines and preventing error (Titus 1:9). I wish the church would invest more time and resources in teaching good theology. I am convinced many young people disengage the church because of bad theology. My concerns here are with the way we teach—or often fail to teach—theology.

When Theology is Dangerous

I love studying theology. I teach a New Testament theology class at Talbot School of Theology, speak on theological issues at Summit Ministries, and teach a high school systematic theology class at a private school in Orange County. Along with philosophy, theology is one of my favorite topics to study. And I wholeheartedly believe that learning theology is vital for spiritual growth. But theology can also be dangerous. My concern is not with theology per se. In fact, good theology is critical for avoiding dangerous doctrines and preventing error (Titus 1:9). I wish the church would invest more time and resources in teaching good theology. I am convinced many young people disengage the church because of bad theology. My concerns here are with the way we teach—or often fail to teach—theology.

Using Logic in Apologetics

In a previous post we introduced the basics of logic. Here we see how logic is used in apologetics encounters. When we apply the science of arguments to apologetics, it is clear that the arguments used against Christianity are often stated informally. The informal statement “I don’t believe in God because I can’t see him” can be written into a formal syllogism such as: P1: I must see something to believe in it. P2: I don’t see God. Conclusion: Therefore, I don’t believe in God. Notice that Premise 1 (P1) is not stated explicitly in the informal statement, but it is implied. This is where questions are so important in conversations about the gospel. I would not know the reason for someone’s rejection of God unless I asked. Once someone tells me they don’t believe in God because they feel they must see something to believe it, I am able to construct the syllogism above. I can now see his argument clearly and can address it.

  • Resurrection of Jesus
  • Atheism
  • Islam
  • Cults & New Age
  • History
  • Evil & Suffering
  • Relativism
  • Science
  • Creation
  • Evolution
  • Intelligent Design

Why Would They Write That? How Embarrassing Details Support the Bible

British actress Miranda Hart once said, “Life is a series of embarrassing moments which leave you feeling alone in your confusion and shame.” Oftentimes, our embarrassing moments make us so ashamed that we tend to hide our feelings from the public. That being the case, why would anyone deliberately publish writings that expose their most unflattering moments, particularly if they were making up a new religious movement? The criterion of embarrassment can help in determining the answer.

Philosophical Evidence that God Created the Universe

Today, there is no serious debate about whether the universe is eternal or whether it had a beginning. This was not always the case. For centuries the Jews, Christians, and Muslims have held that God created the universe. The first verse of the Bible says “in the beginning, God created the heavens and the earth” (Genesis 1:1).  However, others held that the universe was eternal. This debate was a big deal. You may be reading this thinking, why does it matter? It matters because if the universe is eternal, then there is no need for a universal creator but if the universe began to exist at some point, then it would need a cause which made it begin. It was certainly more attractive for atheists to think the universe was eternal as God would not be necessary.

I consider Greg West's "The Poached Egg" to be one of the best apologetics blogs of all time. Greg has the ability to find articles that grasp the essence of an issue and address it in a deep, thoughtful, balanced and readable way. Highly educational! Highly recommended!

Dr. Edgar Andrews

Emeritus Professor of Materials Science, University of London, UK, Author of Who Made God? Searching for a Theory of Everything

The Poached Egg performs the vital function of communicating truth in an accessible manner that informs without dumbing down and challenges without antagonizing. A great resource for Christians and skeptics alike. There is no apologetics web site quite like it, which reflects Greg West's God-given discernment and wisdom and Greg's desire to provide answers to those who doubt.

Stephen McAndrew

Blogger at Songs of a Semi-Free Man, and author of Why It Doesn't Matter What You Believe If It's Not True: Is There Absolute Truth?

I cannot adequately say how much I appreciate what Greg has done in the service of Christian Apologetics. I am a pastor as well as a high school teacher at a Christian school, and I find myself increasingly saying, 'Why don't you check out the Poached Egg? It's got a TON of resources.' For all the work you do, Greg – thanks!

Anthony Weber

Pastor, teacher, blogger at Empires and Mangers and TC Apologetics, author of Learning To Jump Again: A Memoir Of Grief And Hope

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