Being faithful to Jesus Christ requires a broader picture of the task of giving sound reasons for the faith. Traditionally, the task of offering sound reasons to believe has been accomplished primarily by giving arguments for Christianity and against non-Christian perspectives. While arguments are important, they are only one of the ways apologetics encourage the development of Christian belief. Sometimes these impediments are actually intellectual objections—such as the notion that science has disproved God’s existence or that the existence of other religions makes it impossible to assert the truthfulness of Christianity. Other times, impediments to belief are based on misunderstandings of Christian teachings. Some think, for example, that the Trinity is the same as polytheism and that all Christians homeschool their kids, believe that the King James Version is the only inspired version of the Bible and believe that AIDS is God’s judgment on homosexuals. These are misunderstandings, and bringing some clarity to these issues can help people take Christianity seriously. Even more important than the task of clearing away impediments to belief, however, is the task of being authentically Christian as you offer arguments, answer objections and clarify issues. The attitude with which you engage questions can itself be a powerful apologetic or powerful deterrent.   – James K. Beilby (Thinking About Christian Apologetics pp. 23,24)