If we’re only our bodies, life is meaningless

by Lenny Esposito

What is the thing that makes me me? I found an interesting comic on the Internet the other day that does a great job in unpacking one of the problems of the materialist position that all we are is the sum total of our physical makeup. You can read the whole thing here, (it’s rather long) but I will summarize.

The comic depicts a day where science has finally invented a machine to transport objects instantly from one location to the other. Think Star Trek. Of course, everyone hails this great technological feat, but at least one man, the protagonist of the strip, is disturbed. The comic states:

The machines did more than transport people. They also killed them. Since the machines didn’t use exactly the same atoms in exactly the same position, what arrived on the other side wasn’t the original but only a copy. However, because the copy had the memory of the original’s past, it believed it was the same person.

The man is disgusted at the wholesale death that people were accepting for the sake of convenience, which he deems immoral. He eventually meets the inventor of the machine and confronts him on such wanton disregard for human life. The inventor counters by answering, “My boy, surely you don’t think that ‘you’ are the individual atoms of your body, do you? One carbon atom is the same as the next! And your body itself flushes out and replaces atoms all the time, yet

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you say nothing of copies. ‘You’ are not the atoms in your body but the pattern of the atoms.” The man realizes now that every day he awakes his atoms are different. He dies every night as he loses consciousness and a copy wakes in the morning with the memories of the past. The man goes into an existential crisis.

The question of identity that the strip portrays is one that has a long history in philosophy, going back to ancient Greece. Known as Theseus’ Paradox, it is usually represented as a ship piloted by Theseus whose weather-worn components are replaced one at a time until eventually there are no original parts. Is this still Theseus’ ship? What if one were to take all those original pieces and reassemble them right next to the repaired ship? Which would properly be Theseus’ ship now?

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Come Reason’s Apologetics Notes: If we’re only our bodies, life is meaningless