Defending Your Faith in the Classroom

by Lenny Esposito

Last week, I told you about someone who asked for help when his Sociology professor broached the subject of religion, but basically dismissed it as a fabrication. The student wrote:

Some notable points he brought up, which are straight from the Sociology textbook, is that all religion is “socially constructed” and that faith is “belief without scientific evidence.” …

He stated that religion is constantly evolving and falsely asserted that Christianity was the first to develop monotheism. His final statement was made near the end of the lecture that “we all need to exercise some level of spirituality in order to survive” since religion provides comfort in the case of tragedy.

How does one, especially as a student, respond to such claims? It’s apparent the professor has already chosen where he stands concerning religion. When another spoke up during the lecture, it was clear all he wants to do is debate. As Christians, should we speak up or not cast our pearls before swine?

For the answer to the main charges, you can read my last article here. As to the question of engagement, let me say that I’ve received more and more of these kinds of questions in recent years. Sometimes, they even come in the form of a plea, where the Christian really wants to defend his or her faith but doesn’t know how. There’s a real conflict here. On one hand, we want to share the truth of the Gospel message with others and not let mischaracterizations about our faith remain unanswered. On the other, the student recognizes the professor holds the position of power, not only in terms of stature and who gets to speak in class, but ultimately because the prof assigns the final grade for the course.

First, Pick Your Battles

My first piece of advice to this student is to be thoughtful. Exchanges with those in authority need to be judicious and part of that is weighing what the reaction to an objection may be. Jesus told us, “Behold, I am sending you out as sheep in the midst of wolves, so be wise as serpents and innocent as doves” (Matt 10:16, ESV) and that applies here. The professor is the “man with the microphone,” which means he controls the conversation. That also means you probably won’t be able to have a sustained argument in class, which is appropriate since that’s really not what the class is for anyway.

We have a couple of good examples of how Christians faced such conditions in the New Testament…

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Defending Your Faith in the Classroom | Come Reason’s Apologetics Notes