Talking Wrong and Testimony as Trustworthy

by Lenny Esposito

When I was a kid, I listened to Steve Martin’s Wild and Crazy Guy album. Martin told a joke there about a dirty trick to play on a three year old kid:

In the clip, Martin explains “Kids learn how to talk from listening to their parents. So, if you have a three-year-old kid and you want to play a dirty trick on him, whenever you’re around him you talk wrong. So now it’s like his first day in school and he raises his hand: “May I mambo dogface to the banana patch?”1

Martin’s joke is funny, but it actually highlights an interesting point about the nature of being reasonable. Kids DO believe others will talk with them in a way that’s trustworthy. They believe parents will give them a basically truthful concept of the world, that they will be honest in using words and filling them with proper meaning, and that, dad jokes excepted, people are not trying to intentionally mislead them.

We shouldn’t think of children as being unreasonable in trusting the statements of others even with no evidence. One of the reasons that dad’s tall tales work on kids is because dad is generally otherwise trustworthy. Those tall tales leverage the child’s inexperience and their reasonable trust of authority.

The Principle of Testimony

However, children are not the only ones to whom it would be considered reasonable to hold to the general trustworthiness of others. All people must operate on this principle in order to have a world that makes any sense at all…

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