Trying to Become More Relevant Makes Liberal Churches Less Relevant

by Lenny Esposito

There has been a lot of noise about the rise of the Nones in the U.S. As the 2014 Religious Landscape Study reported, more people are not identifying with any organized religious. That doesn’t mean they are all atheists, though. According to the Pew organization that published the study, “the majority of Americans without a religious affiliation say they believe in God. As a group, however, the ‘nones’ are far less religiously observant than Americans who identify with a specific faith.”1 The rise of the Nones mirror the decline in mainline Protestant denominations, while religious groups such as Evangelicals are holding steady or even growing slightly. Millennials are increasingly identifying as Nones.

None of this is surprising. Millennials take an increasingly subjective view of faith claims, just as the more mainline denominations had held and taught. I believe the problem stems from the shift that occurred in the theology of mainline seminaries and churches. In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, mainline denominations became increasingly more theologically liberal, spiritualizing what had previously been understood as objective morality and a record of historic events. This was their fatal move, as Francis Schaeffer pointed out…

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Trying to Become More Relevant Makes Liberal Churches Less Relevant | Come Reason’s Apologetics Notes