Christianity: It’s Either Objectively True or Objectively False

by Amy Hall

Lately, I’ve begun to realize just how much relativism is ingrained in our culture, particularly when it comes to religion. In conversations with people about Christianity, I’ve found that sometimes I am literally unable to communicate the idea that I’m claiming Christianity is an objectively true description of reality. Unfortunately, I’ve even had a conversation or two like this with Christians.

But communicating this is what we must do if we’re truly to communicate the Gospel, because the Gospel is centered on an objective event in history. As the Apostle Paul said, “If Christ has not been raised, your faith is worthless.” Often, by explaining the centrality of the historical death and resurrection of Christ, you can help someone to understand the objective nature of our claim—that is, the claim that Christianity is the kind of thing that is either objectively true or objectively false—because history is something most people understand as being objective.

There are consequences to misunderstanding the objective nature of Christianity. J. Warner Wallace describes one consequence like this:

I sometimes ask Christian students if they would be willing to follow me into the streets of the nearest big city to try to convince people that chocolate chip cookies are the best cookies in the world. Unsurprisingly, students aren’t usually excited about going. When asked, they quickly admit that it seems pointless to try to convince people of something as subjective as a personal opinion about cookies. They recognize that cookie preference is a matter of subjective opinion, rather than objective truth, and none of them are typically willing to go out of their way to argue for an opinion

The Poached Egg ApologeticsFOLLOW THE LINK BELOW TO READ THE FULL ARTICLE >>>

Stand to Reason | Christianity: It’s Either Objectively True or Objectively False