Those Who Complain About Fake News Can’t Reject Absolute Truth

by Lenny Esposito

Fake news has really been making the news. Both Facebook and Google have announced they will not advertising from websites pedaling fake news, according to the New York Times.1 Facebook has gone one step further and announced new features allowing end users to flag stories as “disputed.” Such stories will then be displayed with a warning label if they are shared on users’ timelines.

Given the terrible track record social media sites have of allowing end users to “dispute” the posts they dislike, I can see a huge problem with this policy. Just see how often YouTube blocks videos by Dennis Prager and Christina Hoff Summers, not because they’re offensive or not factual, but because opponents disagree with their messages. Certainly, there will be many internet trolls who are going to abuse the system, trying to censor those sites they simply don’t like. While Facebook has announced that all reports will first be run through “third-party fact checking organizations,” there are major problems with the proposal, as Mollie Hemingway has deftly noted.

The Contradiction in Complaining About Fake News

I’m very concerned about how this newfound attempt to squash false information can stifle the free exchange of ideas. One of the more telling reasons to question the earnestness of the effort is the glaring inconsistency the leaders on the left have shown in their own beliefs. After her defeat in the U.S. presidential election, Hillary Clinton recently spoke out against the “epidemic of fake news,” which she characterized as “one threat in particular that should concern all Americans.” President Obama had also decried misinformation being passed along as fact, stating:

If we are not serious about facts and what’s true and what’s not — and particularly in an age of social media where so many people are getting their information in soundbites and snippets off their phones — if we can’t discriminate between serious arguments and propaganda, then we have problems. If everything seems to be the same and no distinctions are made, then we won’t know what to protect. We won’t know what to fight for.2

I agree with the president in this statement. I think he’s right that we must take truth seriously; distinguishing propaganda from fact. But, to do so one must assume there is a truth out there to know. In other words, truth is something different than what people want it to be. Ostensibly, fake news is considered such because it doesn’t match the truth that is discoverable by reasonable people. Using the philosopher’s definition, truth is what corresponds to what really is the case.

So, in order to campaign against fake news, one must hold to some standard of absolute truth…

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Those Who Complain About Fake News Can’t Reject Absolute Truth | Come Reason’s Apologetics Notes