Unhinging the Extraordinary Claims Require Extraordinary Evidence Mantra

by Lenny Esposito

As it is Easter season, skeptic Michael Shermer has an article in appearing in Scientific American entitled, “What Would It Take to Prove the Resurrection?” Shermer writes that as a skeptic, there are propositions he can accept as true, such as the number of pages in a magazine, the extinction of the dinosaurs, and the origin of the universe by a big bang. Unsurprisingly however, Shermer can think of nothing that would count as enough evidence for the resurrection for that particular proposition to be considered true. He claims this is due to the “principle of proportionality,” something that “demands extraordinary evidence for extraordinary claims. Of the approximately 100 billion people who have lived before us, all have died and none have returned, so the claim that one (or more) of them rose from the dead is about as extraordinary as one will ever find.” 1

So, Shermer has fallen back to the old canard that extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence. But what does he mean “extraordinary evidence?” The phrase sounds good, but is truly fuzzy when one thinks about it. As I’ve stated before, evidence is either strong or weak; categories like extraordinary don’t really fit here. But it isn’t as though we have no evidence. Shermer himself brings up eyewitness testimony, quickly dismissing them as possibly being superstitious or seeing “what they wanted to see.” But what evidence has Shermer offered for those motivations? He’s offered nothing except the claims…

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Unhinging the Extraordinary Claims Require Extraordinary Evidence Mantra | Come Reason’s Apologetics Notes