• The study of apologetics is desperately needed for all Christians today, both for engaging with the secular world and, less obviously, for engaging with groups that teach an unbiblical version of Christianity. But, for some reason, the church is still largely blind to this need. — Natasha Crain (from, Progressive Christianity is as Much of a Threat to Your Kids’ Faith as Atheism)
  • The church needs apologetics just as much as it ever has.  The challenges that Christians are facing from the culture are varied and numerous.  From secular university campuses to political forces to a growing body of “nones” (the non-religious) among Millennials, Christians need to know that there are reasons for their faith.  In some local congregations, there is minimal support for apologetics, either because church leadership has not prioritized it, or because most members are not knowledgeable in it.  Especially if you find yourself in one of those local churches, start making efforts to help more Christians to be knowledgeable about apologetics. — Logan Judy (from, 5 New Year’s Resolutions for Christian Apologists)
  • We could put it this way: The shadows prove the sunshine. There can be sunshine without shadows, but there can’t be shadows without sunshine. In other words, there can be good without evil, but there can’t be evil without good; and there can’t be objective good without God. So evil may show there’s a devil out there, but it can’t disprove God. Evil actually boomerangs back to show that God exists. — Frank Turek (from, Why Evil Disproves Atheism)
  • The goal of apologetics is not merely to persuade one that a God exist. At minimum, if we succeed, then we have only acquiesced to convert humans into demons for even they believe that God exist (James 2:19).  As apologist we have many targets, applications, and contexts yet always one goal. We are winning people to Christ. We have intellectual focus but our main focus is to win people and not merely arguments. We do Christ and our mission great disservice if we answer objections in various realms and capacities yet relinquish a presentation of Christ. Will it always happen in the conversation at hand? No, but that should be our aim knowing tomorrow is not promised and that Christ may return at any moment. — Cam Triggs (from, Christ-Centered Apologetics)
  • Quite honestly, I’m exhausted by Christians who don’t want to learn more. It’s one thing to not know much about our faith, but another to have no desire to grow…I’m saddened that atheists are so passionate about what they believe that they will read stacks of books in order to define their beliefs, while we are happy to float along the surface with a (no offense) ‘Hillsong-deep theology’ and call it good. And we wonder why people are leaving the Church in droves! A church that offers only emotional, squishy feel-good theology is going to lose the long-term wrestling match to a well-read and convincing atheist nearly every time. — Ethan Renoe (from, The Dumbing Down of Christianity)
  • Defending the faith to the best of our ability is not a luxury or an indulgence in intellectual vanity. It is the task given to each one of us as we bear witness to our faith before the world. — R.C. Sproul (from, Defending Your Faith: An Introduction to Apologetics)
  • If feelings don’t inform faith, then what does? Biblical faith is informed by evidence. Jesus said, “Even though you do not believe me, believe the works” (John 10:38). What works is He talking about? The blind are seeing. The lame are walking. The deaf are hearing. The dead are rising. He is saying, “Believe based on the objective evidence.” Emotions can be unreliable guides to the truth. But evidence doesn’t lie.— Tim Barnett (from, Is Faith Just a Feeling?)
  • Apologists are pretty aware that, in general, the church doesn’t care as much about apologetics as it should—and we’re correct that it should. Hearing the statistics on the youth exodus from the church, we know the situation is becoming dire. The church at large must embrace apologetics. This isn’t something we can afford to get wrong. Meanwhile, we find ourselves in a culture increasingly numb to the need for answers. Many unbelievers assume the search for truth has become irrelevant, unattractive, or uncompelling, leaving us in a position where we must first cultivate an interest in such a search in order to pass “Go.” — Mia Langford (from, The Missing Link: The Case for Pre-Apologetics)
  • Christians are often accused of taking a “blind leap into the dark.” However, my father Josh set out to disprove the Christian faith historically, but instead found the evidence powerful and convincing. So, when he became a Christian, it wasn’t a blind leap into the dark, but a knowledgeable step into the light. He placed the evidence onto the scales, and in his estimation, it tipped in favor of Jesus Christ as the Son of God, resurrected from the dead. You may be convinced by the evidence. On the other hand, you may find it wanting. But the claim that “faith is blind” simply ignores the biblical and historical evidence. In fact, only someone who hasn’t truly weighed the evidence could make such a claim. If you haven’t considered the evidence yet, maybe now is the time. — Sean McDowell (from, Clearing the Fog: “Christianity Doesn’t Need Evidence Because Faith is Blind”)
  • There is an important difference between the apostle martyrs and those who die for their beliefs today. Modern martyrs act solely out of their trust in beliefs that others have taught them. The apostles died for holding to their own testimony that they had personally seen the risen Jesus. Contemporary martyrs die for what they believe to be true. The disciples of Jesus died for what they knew to be either true or false. ― Gary Habermas, (from, The Case For The Resurrection Of Jesus)
  • Parents need to prepare their kids for the college years or just the post-high school years. There will be skeptics that will get in their faces and ask them questions they have never heard before, challenging their faith. Unsurprisingly, they’ll return home after the first or second semester declaring, “Mom and dad, I don’t believe in God anymore.” What’s worse is that some of their “challengers” will be their own professors, since sixty percent of secular university professors are atheists.  Here’s the irony; parents send their kids to college to learn about truths. Those same professors will be the ones telling your kids, “There is no truth,” and parents are paying for that! — Claudia Kalmikov (from, My Favorite Resources to Help Train Youth & Anyone in Apologetics)
  • Readers of [John] Wesley and other great ministers of the past, such as Jonathan Edwards or Charles Finney, will easily see, if they know what it is they are looking at, how much use those ministers made of careful logic. Similarly for the great Puritan writers of an earlier period, and for later effective Christians such as C. S. Lewis and Francis Schaeffer. They all make relentless use of logic, and to great good effect. With none of these great teachers is it a matter of trusting logic instead of relying upon the Holy Spirit. Rather, they well knew, it is simply a matter of meeting the conditions along with which the Holy Spirit chooses to work. — Dallas Willard (from, Jesus The Logician)

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