Return to the Resurrection

by Travis Satterfield

The Theological Significance of the Resurrection of Christ

It is that time of year again. We Christians are gearing up for Easter services in our churches, Easter egg hunts in our yards, and Easter clothes on our children. As with Jesus’ birth at Christmas, we put forth a concerted effort to commemorate the final days of Jesus’ earthly ministry, culminating in dying on the cross and rising from the grave.

This is that important time of year when we return to the resurrection.

But, how important is the resurrection? The late Marcus Borg, a leader of the Jesus Seminar (see here, here, and here), wrote:

As a child, I took it for granted that Easter meant that Jesus literally rose from the dead. I now see Easter very differently. For me, it is irrelevant whether or not the tomb was empty. Whether Easter involved something remarkable happening to the physical body of Jesus is irrelevant.[1]

Many saw Borg as an authority in New Testament theology and featured him regularly on documentaries about Jesus. However, his estimation of the resurrection stands in stark contrast to, say, the Apostle Paul:

“And if Christ be not risen, then is our preaching vain, and your faith is also vain. Yea, and we are found false witnesses of God; because we have testified of God that he raised up Christ: whom he raised not up, if so be that the dead rise not. For if the dead rise not, then is not Christ raised: And if Christ be not raised, your faith is vain; ye are yet in your sins. Then they also which are fallen asleep in Christ are perished. If in this life only we have hope in Christ, we are of all men most miserable.” (1 Corinthians 15:14-19)

Here’s the thing…
 

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Return to the Resurrection